Trailer for the final show of “City of New York, 2013”

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Caregivers

This month I am talking with caregivers in NYC.  I am writing music based on some of the incredible stories of selflessness, compassion and love that they have shared with me.  I pulled up some statistics about disabilities and the number of people who require daily assistance from others because of their disability.  I found it really fascinating. These numbers are a little outdated, but still really eye-opening. If you are in NYC this week, this show is Wed. the 20th at the Douglass Street Music Collective in Brooklyn.

As always, thanks for reading – 

Matt

 

 

Disabilities in America

Info is from from www.disabledinaction.org

51.2 million
Number of people who have some level of disability. They represent 18 percent of the population.

32.5 million
Number of people with a severe disability. They represent 12 percent of the population.

11%
Percentage of children ages 6 to 14 who have a disability. This amounts to 4 million children.

72%
Percentage of people 80 and older with disabilities, the highest of any age group.

20%
Percentage of females with a disability, higher than the 17 percent of males. On the other hand, among children under 15, boys were more likely than girls to have a disability (11 percent versus 6 percent).

 

Using or Needing Assistance

10.7 million
Number of people age 6 and older who need personal assistance with one or more activities of daily living (such as taking a bath or shower) or instrumental activities of daily living (such as using the telephone). This group amounts to 4 percent of people in this age category.

2.7 million
Number of people age 15 and older who use a wheelchair. Another 9.1 million use an ambulatory aid such as a cane, crutches or walker.

 

Specific Disabilities

1.8 million
Number of people age 15 and older who report being unable to see.

1 million
Number of people age 15 and older who report being unable to hear.

2.6 million
Number of people age 15 and older who have some difficulty having their speech understood by others. Of this number, 610,000 were unable to have their speech understood at all.

14.3 million
Number of people with limitations in cognitive functioning or a mental or emotional illness that interferes with their daily activities. This includes those with Alzheimer’s disease, depression and mental retardation. This group comprises 6 percent of the population.

 

On the Job

11.8 million
Number of 16- to 64-year-olds who reported the presence of a medical condition that makes it difficult to find a job or remain employed. They comprise 6 percent of the population.

56%
Percentage of people ages 21 to 64 having some type of disability and also employed in the last year. The rate ranged from 82 percent of those with a nonsevere disability to 43 percent with a severe disability. For those without a disability, the rate is 88 percent.

44%
Percentage of people with a nonsevere disability who work full time, year-round. This compares to 53 percent without a disability and 13 percent with a severe disability.

 

Perceived Health Status

33%
Percentage of people ages 25 to 64 who have a nonsevere disability and report their health as being “very good” or “excellent.” This compares with 13 percent of those with a severe disability and 73 percent of those without a disability.

 

Income and Poverty

$22,000
Median earnings for people with a nonsevere disability. This compares to $25,000 for those with no disability and $12,800 for those with a severe disability.

18%
Percentage of people with a nonsevere disability and household incomes of $80,000 or more. By comparison, 26 percent of people without a disability had household incomes of $80,000 or more with the same being true of 9 percent of those with a severe one.

11%
The poverty rate for people ages 25 to 64 with a nonsevere disability. This compares to 26 percent for those with a severe disability and 8 percent of those without a disability.

 

Living Arrangements

60%
Percentage of people ages 25 to 64 with a nonsevere disability who live in married-couple families. The corresponding rates are 68 percent for those without disabilities and 50 percent for people with severe disabilities.

23%
Percentage of people with a nonsevere disability who live alone or with nonrelatives. This compares with 28 percent of those with a severe disability and 19 percent without a disability.

 

Education

33%
The percentage of people ages 25 to 64 who had a nonsevere disability and were college graduates. This compares with 43 percent with no disability and 22 percent with a severe disability.

 

Plugged In

36% and 29%
Percentages of people ages 15 to 64 with a severe disability who use a computer and the Internet at home, respectively. The respective figures for those without a disability are 61 percent and 51 percent.

 

Serving Our Nation

2.6 million
Number of veterans who received compensation for service-related disabilities as of 2004. Of these vets, 506,000 served in World War II; 237,000 in Korea; 1 million in Vietnam; and 540,000 in the Persian Gulf (the data cover service from August 2, 1990, to September 30, 2004).

 

Religion in NYC

Writing music based on religious believers this month. I’m wondering if the religious populations in NYC are the same as in 2001.

from wikipedia:

As reported in 2001 the religious affiliations of the people of New York were:

6% of the people surveyed refused to answer.

Addiction

Hi all, 

I’ve been reading a lot lately about drug abuse, addiction, recovery, and how all of these things relate to our society. This month I am writing music based on conversations with individuals who have overcome drug and alcohol addiction – the recovery process is a brutal experience for a lot of these people, but ultimately one which is often filled with profound hope and gratitude. 

I came across these eye opening facts about addiction from the website for The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University – It’s worth a read if you have a minute. Some of it really surprised me. 

Talk soon,

Matt

A child who reaches age 21 without smoking, drinking or using other drugs is virtually certain never to do so.
Teens who have infrequent family dinners are more than twice as likely to say that they expect to try drugs in the future.
Teens who have infrequent family dinners are twice as likely to have used tobacco; almost twice as likely to have used alcohol, and one and a half times likelier to have used marijuana.
5.7 million (26 percent) of public school students ages 12 to 17 say that their school is both gang- and drug-infected (drugs are used, kept or sold on school grounds).
Teens who attend schools infected with both gangs and drugs are five times likelier to use marijuana; three times likelier to drink; twelve times likelier to smoke; three times likelier to be able to get marijuana within an hour or less and five times likelier to get it within a day or less; and nearly five times likelier to have a friend/classmate who uses illegal drugs like acid, ecstasy, methamphetamine, cocaine or heroin.
Teens who have infrequent family dinners are twice as likely to use tobacco or marijuana; more than one and a half times likelier to use alcohol; and twice as likely to expect to try drugs in the future.
Teens who have seen their parent(s) drunk are more than twice as likely to get drunk in a typical month, and three times likelier to use marijuana and smoke cigarettes.
In 2009, more than one third of teens (8.7 million) said they can get prescription drugs to get high within a day; nearly one in five teens (4.7 million) could get them within an hour.
70 percent of abused and neglected children have parents who are risky drinkers or use other drugs.
Half of college students binge drink and/or use other drugs and almost a quarter meet medical criteria for alcohol or drug addiction.
Forty-nine percent (3.8 million) of full time college students binge drink, misuse prescription drugs and/or use illegal drugs.
1.8 million full-time college students (22.9 percent) meet the medical criteria for substance abuse and addiction.
In 2001 there were 1,717 deaths from unintentional alcohol-related injuries on college campuses.
In 2001, 97,000 students were victims of alcohol-related rape or sexual assaults on college campuses.
In 2001, 696,000 students were assaulted by a student who had been binge drinking on college campuses.
25.9 percent of underage drinkers meet clinical criteria for alcohol addiction.
Each day more than 13,000 children and teens take their first drink.
Children and teens that begin drinking before age 15 are four times likelier to become alcohol addicted than those who do not drink before age 21.
If a teen is drinking, the odds are that teen is getting drunk – and teens who get drunk are much likelier to try marijuana and hang out with friends who are misusing prescription drugs or using illegal drugs.

Crime

1.5 million of the 2.3 million inmates in the U.S. meet the DSM IV medical criteria for substance abuse or addiction.
458,000 inmates have histories of substance abuse; were under the influence of alcohol or other drugs at the time of their crime; committed their offense to get money to buy drugs; were incarcerated for an alcohol or drug law violation; or shared some combination of these characteristics.
Only 11 percent of all inmates with substance abuse and addiction disorders receive any treatment during their incarceration.
In 2006, alcohol and other drugs were involved in 78 percent of violent crimes; 83 percent of property crimes; and 77 percent of public order, immigration or weapon offenses; and probation/parole violations.
Alcohol is implicated in the incarceration of more than half of all inmates in America; illicit drugs are implicated in three quarters of incarcerations.
Only two percent of all inmates are incarcerated for marijuana possession as their controlling or only offense.
Eighty percent of the nation’s adult inmates and juvenile arrestees either committed their offenses while high, stole to buy drugs, violated alcohol or drug laws, had a history of substance abuse/addiction, or shared some mix of these characteristics.
Only 3.6 percent of the 1.9 million substance-involved juvenile arrestees receive substance abuse treatment.
At least 30 percent of adults in prison for felony crimes were incarcerated as juveniles.
Ninety-two percent of arrested juveniles who tested positive for drugs, tested positive for marijuana; 14.4 percent, for cocaine.
Four of every five children and teen arrestees in state juvenile justice systems are under the influence of alcohol or drugs while committing their crimes, test positive for drugs, are arrested for committing an alcohol or drug offense, admit having substance abuse and addiction problems, or share some combination of these characteristics.

Cost to Society

Substance abuse and addiction cost federal, state and local governments at least $467.7 billion in 2005.
For every $100 spent by state governments on substance abuse and addiction, the average spent on prevention, treatment and research was $2.38; Connecticut spent the most, $10.39; New Hampshire spent the least, $0.22.
For each dollar in alcohol and tobacco taxes and liquor store revenues that federal and state governments collect, $8.95 is spent on shoveling up the consequences of substance abuse and addiction.
Almost a quarter of a trillion dollars of the nation’s yearly health care bill is attributable to substance abuse and addiction.
Of every dollar government spends on substance abuse and addiction, 96 cents goes to shovel up the wreckage in crime healthcare and other social costs; only 2 cents goes to prevention and treatment.
90 percent of homeless have alcohol problems; 60 percent abuse other drugs.
Underage drinkers and adult pathological drinkers account for at least $48.3 billion and as much as $62.9 billion in alcohol sales in 2001.
Alcohol abuse and addiction cost the nation an estimated $220 billion in 2005 – more than cancer ($196 billion) and obesity ($133 billion).

Women and Girls

Girls and women become addicted to alcohol, nicotine and illegal and prescription drugs, and develop substance-related diseases at lower levels of use and in shorter periods of time than their male counterparts.
Fifteen million girls and women use illicit drugs and misuse prescription drugs.
Thirty-two million girls and women smoke cigarettes.
Six million girls and women are alcohol abusers and alcoholics.
Girls and young women are likelier to abuse substances in order to lose weight, relieve stress or boredom, improve their mood, reduce sexual inhibitions, self-medicate depression, and increase confidence.
High school girls drink, smoke and use illegal drugs as much as their male classmates.
At the same level of exposure to tobacco smoke, women have a greater risk of developing lung cancer than men.
Teen girls are more likely than boys to use over-the-counter drugs to get high.
Nearly one-quarter of all girls report beginning to drink alcohol before age 13.
Alcohol is involved in as many as 73 percent of all rapes and up to 70 percent of all incidents of domestic violence.

Marijuana

In 2007, approximately 204,000 high-school seniors used marijuana on a daily basis.
Almost 10 million 12- to 17-year olds can buy marijuana within a day, and almost four and a half million can buy it within an hour or less.
Since 1992, there has been a 175 percent jump in marijuana potency.
Scientific research suggests possible associations between marijuana use and schizophrenia, other psychotic disorders, and other mental health problems.

Tobacco

12- to 17-year olds who smoke are more than five times likelier to drink and 13 times likelier to use marijuana than nonsmokers.
61 million Americans are hooked on cigarettes.
Smoking at a young age is related to panic attacks, general anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Illegal Drugs/Rx Drugs

The number of illegal drug users has risen to 20 million in 2005.
Since 1992, the number of teen illegal drug users has more than doubled to 2.6 million in 2005.
85 percent of Web sites selling controlled prescription drugs do not require a prescription.
From 1992 to 2003 the number of Americans abusing controlled prescription drugs jumped from 7.8 to 15.1 million.
Prescription drug abuse is the most rapidly increasing drug abuse among teens.
Five million teens can get prescription drugs to get high within an hour.

Alcohol

1 in 4 Americans will have an alcohol or drug problems at some point in their lives.
The number of alcohol abusers and addicts holds steady at about 16 to 20 million.
Half of college students binge drink and/or abuse other drugs and almost a quarter meet medical criteria for alcohol or drug dependence.
Forty-nine percent (3.8 million) of full time college students binge drink and/or abuse prescription and illegal drugs.
In 2001 there were 1,717 deaths from unintentional alcohol-related injuries on college campuses.
Each day more than 13,000 children and teens take their first drink.
Underage drinkers and adult pathological drinkers consume between 37.5 percent and 48.8 percent of the value of all alcohol sold in the United States.
Six million girls and women are alcohol abusers and alcoholics.
The incidence of lifetime alcohol abuse and dependence is greatest for those who begin drinking between the ages of 11 and 14.
90 percent of homeless have alcohol problems; 60 percent abuse other drugs.